Petal® Dining Table

Designed By Richard Schultz, 1960

Richard Schultz cites Queen Anne's Lace as his inspiration for this delicate outdoor table with its flower-like top sprouting from the elegant pedestal base. Each "petal" expands and contracts independently, ensuring stability in changing weather.

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Details

FEATURES

The Petal Table was designed to accompany the Bertoia Chairs that Harry Bertoia designed for Knoll. The tops on these tables are made of eight petals, which are mounted on a beautifully crafted cast aluminum spider.
The tables were inspired by Queen Anne's Lace, a weed that grows in Pennsylvania. Each cluster of flowers is supported on its own stem. By making a table in this manner there is no need for a ring support, and each petal is independent which allows the table to expand and contract with the weather.


CONSTRUCTION

White Petals: Machined High Density Polyurethane
Top spider: Powder Coated Cast Aluminum
Stem: Powder Coated Stainless Steel
Base: Powder Coated Cast Aluminum
Glides: Molded Nylon


FINISHES

Top spider: Powder Coated Cast Aluminum
Stem: Powder Coated Stainless Steel
Base: Powder Coated Cast Aluminum
Glides: Molded Nylon

Dimensions

 
PETAL® DINING TABLE

107cm D x 71cm H.


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Product Story image

Richard Schultz:

“I designed the Petal Table to accompany the Bertoia Chairs. The tops on the tables are made of eight petals, which are mounted on a beautifully crafted cast aluminum spider.

"I was inspired by Queen Anne’s lace, a weed that grows near our house in Pennsylvania. Each cluster of flowers is supported on its own stem. By making a table in this manner there is no need for a ring support, and each petal is independent, which allows the table to expand and contract with the weather.

"The tables were introduced by Knoll in Los Angeles in 1960 and were immediately made part of the MoMA design collection.”

Designer image

Richard Schultz joined Knoll Associates in 1951 to work with Harry Bertoia, after studying at Iowa State University and the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago. In addition to his work for Knoll, he designed an office system for Stow/Davis. He also taught basic design at the Philadelphia College of Art and had a one-man show of his sculpture at The Museum of Modern Art, New York.

Richard Schultz(1926) Birthplace USA


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